Monday, 7 May 2012

Hakodate-Aomori-Hakodate

Another day, another train: this time, it's a scenic journey from Tomakomai to Hakodate:

Standard car:


Green car with 'panoramic' windows:

 

Some views from the train:

 





 

Luncheon bento boxes are ordered in advance from the stewardesses and delivered fresh at a station further along the line:


Me with stewardesses:


Luncheon bento box, freshly delivered:



More scenic views from the train:









The train at Hakodate, which was the end of the line:

 

A more modern 'Heat 789' train at the next platform:



Nothing out of service:


A slightly sick-looking monkey:


Hakodate Station:

 

Downtown Hakodate:



Snow piled up under a motorway:



 The Seikan route from Hakodate to Aomori is Japan's oldest ferry service. Until the latter-1980s, it was operated by a large fleet of train ferries, one of which, the Mashu Maru, is preserved as a 'museum ship' on Hakodate's waterfront:






 

A modern-day car ferry to Aomori leaves the harbour:



Hakodate tram cars:




 

 The KFC Colonel - patron of those who don't really care what they put inside themselves.


A rather eccentic Japanese fast food diner, near the ferry terminal:


The ferry terminal:

 


Our ship, the Asakaze 21:







A full load of freight for off-loading in Aomori:




 

For the return leg, the Virgo:







Non-scenic, not very grand baths, not in use:


Pink cafeteria:

 

Vending machines for food:

 


Looks ghastly. Nearly all is forgiven, KFC:


I fashioned a bed for the night in one of the dormitories from all the unused headrests. It was remarkably comfortable, actually:




Approaching Hakodate once again:


Laid-up InCat Natchan World:


Virgo at Hakodate:



The terminal at Hakodate in the morning:

 

Nice paper models of the local ferry fleet:

 

 

Breakfast:


Some of the Natchan World's hull art:





The fish market in Hakodate:


A visit to the veteran train ferry Mashu Maru:



Onboard, there was a very detailed and enlightening exhibition  about the history of the Seikan route's train ferries:




Lovely models:



The 1960s train ferries were mechanically innovative. Each was powered by eight V-diesels, four coupled via gearboxes to each of the two propeller shafts:



Mashu Maru's navigation bridge - a fine and intact example of 1960s whizziness:






Wearing the wireless operator's hat (again too small):



Harbour movements:

 




The train back to Tomakomai:



One more bento box:



Next: the best ever Japanese ferry Ishikari. Watch out for the forthcoming installment!

2 comments:

  1. You know where to get the papercrafts seen on your photo?
    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-i-MUSg1eE48/T6gcQ4xXK8I/AAAAAAAAJD4/wGol5k7xRWc/s1600/P1200927.jpg

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  2. Did you bring those paper models home for us. :)
    This is a wonderful trip. Thank you so much.

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